Drawing Blood & Valour: The Legends of the Knight Sir Bevis
Creating the Covers – by Guy Stauber

We are now on the final blog post of our From Concept to Comic series (read part one, two and three by clicking the links). Part four has been written for us by our cover artist, Guy Stauber, who explains his process of taking photo’s from a photoshoot and manipulates them into the final artwork for Blood & Valour. Guy takes it away below:


For the cover art we staged a number of photoshoots with models in period costume. This gave us the opportunity to stage the poses exactly as we needed them, making the content & characters unique to our story.

This is a luxury I don’t normally get to do, but luckily Matt knew some willing participants and was able to get his hands on the right costumes and weapons…This part of the process was crucial for me as an artist, because I could customise the poses on the fly which in turn gives me multiple options when I’m back in my studio.

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From there I used Photoshop to further manipulate the images, adding different hair, weapons and costume elements until I had the overall image I needed. Then I turned each image into a vector halftone. Working in vector means I have maximum flexibility in terms of scaling, editing and workflow.

Next up I started working on backgrounds which involved using a mix of digital and traditional imagery. I added texture, colour and any other embellishments the characters needed like reflections on the armour, glowing eyes or bloodstains.

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Finally, I added the title graphics, referencing vintage comics with the tagline and issue numbers top left. We decided that we wanted a retro comic book vibe that readers would identify with. For example, see our Volume #1 comic below, which features Hayley from the Countess photoshoot.

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Another decision made by the Creative Team was that my covers and internal pages would be quite content/colour rich to contrast with Marcus’ monotone pallet in the sequential storytelling panels. I think this works really well when our two styles meet, but we’ll let you tell us when you read the comic!


We hope you’ve enjoyed learning more about the artwork process of Blood & Valour. A big thank you to Guy Stauber for writing this week’s blog post! Keep checking back for more updates and behind the scenes news.

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